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anniversary of a number of civil rights flashpoints. 1963 was a pretty important year in the civil rights movement or would i will call the black freedom struggle for the rest of the talk and none will be more celebrated than the march on washington that happened on august 28, 1963. i think we can imagine that the focus will be -- this is probably what we are going to see a lot of. dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the i have a dream speech. maybe there will be some mentioning of the complex of the march on washington, the labor unions and the practice and made it possible and did all of the organizing. maybe we will hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we will even hear about the kennedy administration horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. a were concerned there would lead to the point president kennedy's shut down the federal government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus o
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and the demonstrated power of nonviolence and claims for participation in american citizenship and rights, why at this moment in the late 60's to the black panther party challenge america as an empire? way this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to the revolution and the black panther party? and so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we have developed in the book to give you a taste of some of it here. the first thing is that one of the things i was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is in the mid-60's there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l.a., san francisco, oakland, chicago, new york. a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains in the successes and the power of the civil rights movement and translate into that power that can challenge poverty. the civil rights movement have been tremendously successful at dismantling jim crow and d
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and really the demonstrative power of nonviolent civil disobedience and claims of participation and citizenship, why in this moment did the black panther party challenge america as empire? why did this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to revolution and the black panther party? so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we develop in the book just to give you sort of a taste of some of the pieces of the answer here. the first thing is that one of the things that was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is that in the mid '60s there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l. a.m., san francisco and oakland, chicago, new york, a real ferment, a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains and the successes and the power of the civil rights movement, and how do we translate that into the kind of power that can challenge poverty and ghettoization. the civi
. perez who heads the civil rights division at the justice department will have questions to answer, but the doj's decision to drop that now infamous voter intimidation case against the new black panther party, as well as a case headed to the supreme court that could have struck down his legal theories on racial discrimination, for more we're joined by editorial board member mary kissle and political diary editor jason riley. mary, you broke the story a year ago about the involvement in the st. paul case, we've since discovered a lot more details thanks to your digging. why did perez get himself involved in in case? >> well, the city of st. paul, minnesota was challenging, a theory of racial discrimination that tom perez and the justice department were using to accuse banks of discrimination, and so, he feared that if the court struck down this particular rule, that he would have to stop doing that, it would cut off a big source of funding, actually, for the justice department. >> so he leaned on st. paul to drop the case and they'd been litigating for ten years. >> in fact, they di
fighting funding for civil rights in the united states. this should last about an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [applause] >> good evening. i am delighted, truly delighted to see all of you here this evening because this is an extraordinary evening and an extraordinary program. a little preamble, i'm at the virginia foundation for the humanities and and i'm the present of their position which produces activities and programs. [applause] thank you. i'm here to tell you that this is the coldest book festival in history. [laughter] that's a short history, 19 years nonetheless it's the coldest and it doesn't appear to be getting better tomorrow or the next day either. very unusual but spring is again at 7:02 on wednesday. i'm sure none of you noticed along the way. we began that morning with the nineteentnineteent h annual virginia festival of books. next year we want you wanted to come back to the 20th which will begin on march the 19th and run it until the 23rd so we are moving back a day. we expect it to be warmer non
on civil rights for gay americans in bour versus hard wig. in the summer of 1982, michael baurs was arrested and charged by atlanta police by committing a private act with another adult man in his own bedroom. his case made it to the high court in 1986 where georgia's law criminalizing adult gay male couples for engaging in private consensual sexual acts was upheld. it was not until 203 that that decision was overruled when the court recognized the constitutional right to privacy for lesbian and gay individuals. the struggle still continues. ten years after bowers, hawaii supreme court found the state ban own same-sex marriage violated its constitution. almost immediately shall the state specific ruling sparked campaigns across the country to deny marriage rights to same sex couples. launching a preemptive strike against marriage equality more than 30 states passed defense of marriage laws putting pressure on the federal government to follow suit and in 1996, president bill clinton, the democrat, he signed the federal defense of marriage act restricting the definition of marriag
his civil rights movement to a human rights movement. meaningful equality was not to be achieved through civil rights alone without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise, so in honor of dr. king and all of those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we'll commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration, a movement of education, not inv. cation, a movement for jobs, not jails, a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights to work, to shelter, to food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? well, first i believe we got to begin by telling the truth, the whole truth, and admit out loud that we as a nation created a cap-like system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the truth in the schools, in our churches, in our places of worship, behind bars, and in reentry centers. we've got to be willing to tell this truth so that a great a
is the object of civil rights movement. but they never have jojo as a child. but the reader identifies with horton. he's our man can ease our guy. he is our floppy nice element -- nice elephant who is saving someone like me. but he lives in the jungle with a kangaroo give this is not the readers everyday world. --t is the world of google of hooville. that is the world of dr. seuss's child reader. it's as if horton is a mega planet saving the tiny planet earth. or maybe given the socio- specificity of hooville, the modern west. so when the mayor urges for a last voice to make the hoos h crib somestarts on a path where a tiny figure dressed in crimson stands alone. his noses in the air. there is a smirk on his face. he knows what is going on and he doesn't care. he is the kind of child who in 50 stock is cruising for a bruising. who, in 1950s talk, is cruising for a bruising. the mayor grabs the young twerp. leading him up the tower and there is a wonderful bouncing scene where jojo is on the outstretched hand of the mayor and is ready to make a big statement. he clears his throat and he
. >>> 48 years ago this month, the nation reached a turning point in the civil rights movement. the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to birmingham, alabama. >> kill, burn, bomb destroy. people go into selma is a whole different game. >> reporter: harry bellefonte remembers the backdrop, the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not long after 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody sunday happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it. what was the mood? >> the mood was anger. the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and mayhem. the bottom line is we will go back as often as necessary. >> reporter: bring artists into the movement convince the likes of joe biaz and marlin brando but one of his first calls was to old friend and supporter tony bennett. >> i didn't want to do it, but then he told me what went down, what was going down and how some blacks were burned with gasoline thrown on
insurance. >>> this week marks the 48th anniversary of the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to montgomery, alabama. harry belafonte recruited tony bennett to march with him it happened has marchers tried to cross the bridge, known as bloody sunday. the message of civil rights still permeates today. >> selma was different, that they were willing to kill, bomb, burn, destroy, so to ask our people to go there was a whole different game. >> he remembers the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not along at 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody selma happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it, what was the mood? >> the mood was the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and this kind of mayhem. the bottom line was that we go back as often as necessary. >> belafonte, enlisted by dr. king to bring artists into the movement, convinced the likes of joan baez, paul newman and marlon brando, bu
by recalling lifelong support the civil rights movement also opined the brief was legally correct. jay stanley pottinger the assistant attorney general for civil rights argued strenuously against filing. he made three points. the brief is incoherent. no one could tell that the go standard it can change. two, the brief was profoundly misguided would damage the list for schoolchildren. there is no need to file the brief because the civil rights division are to have implement tenet standard for more than a decade. he did not notice only one of these three initially and consistent points could be right. though all three might be wrong. at the end of the meeting, my recommendation was not to file. i'd written a brief and i acquitted myself, but i can't know conker should be given to the violent. solicitor general bork also recommended not filing. that cost him a lot. he knew this would be his last chance for influence in a subject you care deeply about. but if that discouraging defiance was more important and attorney general bv agreed to solicitor general bork. this one in my hand may be the only
here at the law school. prior to joining aclu, he was the chief of the civil rights bureau and the office of the new york state attorney general. he spent 14 yes at the naacp legal defense fund where he supervised the litigation throughout theountry that address matters of elementary and secondary education, a formative action in higher education, and equal educational opportunit he is also the reason why sarah was able to say such nice tings about me because he was my supervisor when i was there and taught me everything that i know. he will discuss issues of racial equality, growing rights and speeches in "the year of the turtle." our seco speaker is peter nicholas. he is a officer of lot the. -- at the university of washington school of law. prior to pursuing in the law, professor nicholas was a research economist at the university of michigan and served as a member of the ann arbor cy council. he will discuss the speeches and the current battles over gay rights, same-sex marriage, the gay minority and the gay minority in the leaders of the african american community. we
. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing out forward and ending the war in vietnam and changing the way we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create up star movements. i think all that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement all that great activism that it produced and all of that we are seeing that directly play out today whether it's the election of barack obama or the continued advancement of women in congress so all that is a direct result of their activism. that being said there is a lot of work left undone and i think that we now spend three fourths of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30 and it used to be we spent three for some people under the age of 30 in terms of the amount of money and investment. it's not in terms of generational warfare but i think we need to have a conversation about how we are dividing our priorities. this is not
is that this is like civil rights. that this is the civil rights movement moved to the gay and lesbian community. why is that not the case? >> well, we understand historically that keeping the races apart is wrong. what marriage is about is bringing together the two opposite halves of humanity for a deep social good. that's why as president obama himself said, there are people of good will on both sides of this issue. what we need the supreme court to do is not try to short circuit this debate. we need to keep the debate alive. americans on both sides of this issue are deeply invested in this debate. we don't need a 50-state solution presented by the supreme court. when our democratic institutions are capable of handling the issue. that's what the court will decide. whether it's going to impose a redefinition of marriage among all americans or whether we're going to be allowed to continue to work on this together state by state. >> so not a roe v. wade decision is what's being argumented, don't make a decision that then sets the stage arguing four years to come. >> look, candy, this case -- the case
. in 1968, dr. king told advocates the time had come to transition from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. many photo-quality could not be achieved through civil rights allowed without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to quality education. civil rights are empty promise. in honor of dr. king and all those who labor to win the election crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a group that for jobs, not jails. is limited and we limited analytical discrimination against people. discrimination that denies basic human rights to work, shelter and two food. what a sweet deal? first we've got to begin by telling the church, the wiltshire. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a catholic system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the center places of worship, behind artist and inventor center. we got to be willing to tell the truth so great awakening to the reality of what has occurred can c
in which you don't have to have a majority position. civil rights not put up for a vote. right. that's right. >> frequently. >> frequently although now what has happened is that this sea change meant they can be successfully put up for a vote. how -- but the third part of it is this interpersonal thing. dan, you said this thing the last time you were on the show, you said the superpower lgbt people have, inherently mixed among the population. >> we are born into the families of the, you know, oppressor class. for lack of any better term. gay people are born to straight parents. the most dash single most for political act of any lgbt person can take is to be out to family and friends. we saw in ohio with senator portman the difference that can make. it can open someone's eyes. republican failure of empathy. senator portman wasn't for marriage when other people's children were allowed to marry, other people's children were gay. now that he has gay child, he sees the justice in gay marriage. we will take the support however we can get it. it shouldn't take people's kids come out but oft
in protecting civil rights, and this is an opportunity to continue to do so. thank you. the rest i mitt. -- submit. >> thank you, supervisor campos. supervisor kim. >> thank you. today i'm introducing a resolution to rename an alley way here in district 6 just a block away from city hall, the [speaker not understood] alley. and i am introducing this resolution with supervisor campos, wiener, and avalos. many of you may have been following in the press some of the recent comments that our former [speaker not understood] leader has made regarding lgbt members of his parliament. due to some of his strong comments and his unwillingness to apologize for it, we have been [speaker not understood] request in our office to consider the renaming of this alley way. it is just a one-block alley way in between van ness and polk street. and after looking at it and determining some of the cost and the scope of the work, we decided that it was worthwhile to move forward with this idea. as we consider what the renaming process would look like, the street's name was originally ivy street. we noted there
organizations who came together on this issue that represent our diverse ethnic community, civil rights, labor, social justice and religious organizations and ask for your support. madam clerk, could you call the roll. >> on item 35, supervisor mar? mar aye. supervisor tang? tang aye. supervisor wiener? wiener aye. supervisor avalos? avalos aye. supervisor breed? breed aye. supervisor campos? campos aye. supervisor chiu? chiu aye. supervisor cohen? cohen aye. supervisor kim? kim aye. there are nine ayes. >> the resolution is adopted. colleagues, we have one additional item on our calendar and that is our 3:30 special commendations related to women's history month. why don't i suggest that we recess for the next 10 minutes and reconvene at 3:30. with that, we are in recess. >> good afternoon. welcome back to the san francisco board of supervisors meeting of tuesday, march the 19th, 2013. madam clerk, could you call our 3:30 special order? >> yes, mr. president. it is now time for the friends of the commission on the status of women inspiring innovation through imagination, celebrating women in
lawyer said ranta planned to file a civil rights lawsuit against the city of new york and the police department. because the incarceration had an immense effect on his health. >> fifteen train cars went off the tracks when a freight train derailed saturday in southern virginia. four of them ended up in the russell fork river. according to the transportation company, c-s- x, one of the derailed cars was leaking. it contained propionic acid, a corrosive material. a hazardous materials team is on the scene. the train was headed from north carolina to kentucky when the accident happened. no injuries were reported. >> big dreamers in 42 states are rushing to buy powerball tickets. the jackpot has climbed to it's sixth highest point. a whopping 3-hundred-20- million dollars. if there's a winner who takes the cash payout. it adds up to just under 2- hundred-million. that's quite a return on a 2-dollar ticket. the drawing is tonight at 8:59 p-m. if you want a ticket == you can head to arizona or oregon. or next month, california is state. >> if anybody can get to arizona in 14 minutes it is
, a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally growing up in far flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a ome. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibility in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle just like previous generations. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, i may not get there with you, but i want you to know that we as a people will get to the promised land. so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you. the joshua generation. for justice, and digget, for opportunity and freedom. for the jewish peopl
from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue and i don't think it's the issue that divides the court. >> joining me now, patricia and head of the supreme court practice. jonathan turley. hello to both of you. welcome. >> hi, alex. >> patricia, i'll begin with you as -- well, let's talk about in terms of prop 8, what we heard just there, correct, i mean, the right to mary already, has it been well-established? >> well, the right to marry is but what the court hasn't grappled with is what is the definition of marriage and that, as we know, is the issue hotly contested in this case and what they will be confronting and in particular what is the role of the courts in that, the role of the states, the role of the federal constitution. so there's much for them to grapple with still. >> jonathan, breakdown for the viewers, if you will, the key issues here for each case. name one key issue for each of them. >> well, first of all, on the threshold level, one is doma, the statute of the defense of marriage act that has formed a discrimination against those who have same-
this equal protection idea. they were about race. >> scott: since the civil war. >> right. the historical case. there are parallels between these kinds of discrimination. here is another difference. in 1967 when the supreme court in loving versus virginia banned gay marriage, in that time, only 16 states retained such a ban. the previous decade plus, 14 states moved away from the bans. we still have a situation where 40 states prohibit same-sex marriage. that may change in four or five years. that is different with the mainstream. >> i would say one of the things that is interesting is how fast public opinion is moving. in the case of interracial marriage in 1967, there were polls showing lower levels of support when the supreme court acted than there are today. there is the fact that many states and one reason is a big regional divide. on the east coast and west coast, there is more sympathy than in the south and middle of the country. >> scott: that goes if they strike down prop 8, they have several options if they strike it down. more or less it is california only option or -- >> there
we're going to win 5-4. i think this is a basic civil rights issue. i don't think this is a kind of issue that will divide the court the way some other issues divide the court. >> do you think it's possible the court makes a decision that doesn't resolve the right question? in other words, it doesn't resolve whether there's a right to marry? >> they could. there's a technical issue called standing that's raised here and the court could decide that the defendants don't have standing. that would result in allowing marriage equality in california because it would affirm the district court but it would not have any general applicability. >> we will be watching, mr. boies. thank you for being here. we're going to take a break. more from our roundtable as we get reaction to the gun debate that you've heard here this [ male announcer ] this is kevin. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for him, he's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. i was okay, but after lunch my knee started to hurt again. and
're right the mental health system needs to be fixed. the civil commitment laws are in a mess. every police officer knows that. we can't even, as i said before, i've been working for 20 years to get those adjudicated, mentally incompetent and dangerous, into the national check system. we're still trying to get that done, and we need enforcement of the federal gun laws. we want to do the real things that make people safe. i mean, what's appalled me about this whole debate is how little it's had to do with making people safe and how much it has to do with the decade agenda to attack the second amendment. >> bottom line. will president obama sign a new set of gun control measures? >> i hope we end up signing something that updates the system and gets those mentally incompetent and adjudicated into the system. we forced the administration somehow to enforce the federal gun laws. i know they don't want to do it but they ought to do it. it's their responsibility. that would make people safe. put programs like project exile in every american city where if you're a drug dealer, a gang member, or a
historic civil rights legislation the income tax cut in just six weeks after the assassination of president kennedy mix to 80 dead and threatened and praised and did what a hands-on leader does and his hands were huge and the stories about johnson grabbing people by the shoulder and just getting right in their grill to make them realize a one part and it was. how about my dad and the managing of the fall of the iron curtain as the soviet empire was collapsing there were significant dangers that there would be violence of epic proportions to be the the united states could have justifiably done a victory dance over the soviets, particularly for example when the berlin wall fell. i will never forget watching my dad on tv and critics, the pundits were saying he should go over there and celebrate with the german people. had my dad done with the people of this year and now wanted to do rather than being a leader would have created greater fall more abilities for gorbachev to create an orderly transfer without will blood shed. amazingly so. a dictatorship of epic proportions in the 20th century fe
says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be fireworks. there won't be cameras present, but we will get same-day audios to hear how everything goes down. >> it's always interesting. because we get the transcripts fwowrks hear the inflection and the voice, always interesting, so, we will have it. >> yes, we will. >> in the next hour, we will have a fair and balanced debate with two key players in the same cases. the head of the national organization for marriage and the national campaign director for the freedom to marry. where do you stand on the two same-sex marriage cases? tweet us your answers. we will read your responses, later on in this show. they came t
young voters see these meters as some of the civil rights issues of our time. >> that is certainly true but this report didn't provide a clear direction for the republican party nor a clear analysis of what specifically went wrong. there was not a clear agenda to revitalize the economy and economic growth and fix an economy that is wobbly. the only real difference that the, at cpac was pat caddell who spoke truth to power about what would be in the report and what the republicans are doing. >> let me say something about what pat said because he will not toot his own horn but he was the only speaker whose speech has not been posted online by the guys that run cpac. >> i watched it online today. >> it has gone viral. >> that is the not the official version and the reason is what pat said a week ago friday. >> what was the message? >> the problem with the autopsy, which, by the way, is...this was what the jerusalem post said in a scandal newsreel, all are guilty but none are responsible. we have no message. meanwhile there was no explanation of the strategic failures, the real tactical fai
down on the midwest right now and headed east. heavy snow and strong winds are creating dangerous conditions. where the system is heading next. damplts pope francis led his first palm sunday service as cardinal. he reportedly supported civil unions. will he bring that style of leadership to the papacy? this as the u.s. supreme court considers same-sex marriage cases. >>> and believe it or not, there's a relatively simple explanation for a car that wound up on the roof of this house in glen dale, california. the good news -- no one was hurt. >>> first the severe weather hitting the midwest. a huge spring snowstorm is bounding the region from missouri to ohio. susan candiotti is in dayton where the snow is falling and it is not expected to stop any time soon. susan? >> reporter: hi, fred. we're kind of between a bit of a wet snow and flurries right now. things have subsided just a bit. temperatures, fred, right now are just above freezing. that's why you can still see grass on the ground. you don't see any accumulation on the pavement so far. you see over my shoulder, that's i-75. t
would oppose a striking down of a right to same sex marriage, you want to leave it in the state legislature? >> look, i would prefer every state in the union keep the definition of marriage that prevailed in western civilization for a couple thousand years. that doesn't look like that is going to happen. so, i certainly at this point would prefer the people of the states to make the decision, as they -- and by the way, chris, it is worth mentioning that the briefs that nicole is supporting, which supports the judge, the prop 8 judge, somebody ought to read his decision, his animus, his hostility to people of faith, was disgusting. >> chris: all right, he's not here to defend himself, but, people can read it if they want and the other case, the court will hear and there are two big cases involves the defense of marriage act. >> right. >> chris: which president clinton signed in 1996. which bans federal marital benefits for same sex couples who are legally married in their states. you have acknowledged states have the right to declare, to decide that same sex marriage is legal. as
right it seems to me to marry. if you want to say they have the 8 state solution where you say these are states that say you you can have civil marriage but can't have marriage per se. can't have a gay marriage. if that is the case why are you stigmatizing marriage in that situation. in the california case a matter of revoking something that has already been granted right to marriage. in both situations it seems you a constitutional right. a human being. an american citizen. you should have equal rights coast-to-coast. you ask the critical question what the rest of the panel is talking about this morning. the politics of it are that if the court rules everybody will be angry at the court and say that supreme court they are an elite and trying to tell us what to do justice kennedy who senator bayh is likely the swing vote. you can't have nine unelected people narrowly focused on the law making big decisions for the country. if that is the way they feel they will make a political decision and say it is up to the the states let them do what they want. con is not a matter of the ci
to look at a lot of new things. ken, michael, stay right there. i'm going to take you ten stories underground to one of the biggest public work projects in the history of civilization. the cost is in the billions and people won't ride this train until 2016. is it worth it? is all we humans get. we spend them on treadmills. we spend them in traffic. and if we get lucky, really lucky, it dawns on us to go spend them in a world where a simple sunrise can still be magic. twenty-five thousand mornings. make sure some of them are pure michigan. your trip begins at michigan.org. there's a reason no one says "easy like monday morning." sundays are the warrior's day to unplug and recharge. what if this feeling could last all week? with centurylink as your trusted partner, it can. our visionary cloud infrastructure and global broadband network free you to focus on what matters. with custom communications solutions and dedicated support, your business can shine all week long. >>> investing in infrastructure is one of the best things we can do to boost the economy. it creates short-term jobs.
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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